Eighth Sunday of Ordinary Time - Year A

“My LORD has forgotten me?” - It is so easy for a person to feel abandoned by God. You likely know, as do I, people who feel God has wronged them, has “forsaken” them due to financial strains, health issues, or the death of a loved one. You likely know people who experience God as the very reason for their suffering or oppression. It is easy to feel forsaken.

Seventh Sunday of Ordinary Time - Year A

Human wisdom can design a machine to illuminate the darkest of earth’s night sky, yet God’s wisdom can shine upon the soul, and transform a human heart. And those are the moments when the voice of Wisdom cries out all around us, for that Wisdom is the grace of God. But yet, at times, does it not feel that God’s wisdom fails to translate into our lived experience?

Fifth Sunday of Ordinary Time - Year A

One of the greatest pilgrimage sites in the world today is that of Lourdes, France. Every year, five million people of all faiths and backgrounds travel to this southern French town to pray at the grotto where Mary, the Mother of God, appeared in 1858 to a young peasant girl, now St. Bernadette Soubirous. Since March 1, 1858, the Church has recognized 65 miracles at Lourdes. 

Third Sunday of Ordinary Time - Year A

A text from the story of the Apostles affirms that “in God we live and move and have our being” (Acts 17:28). But one wonders how this translates into an experience of faith, how this becomes a reality in our relationship with God. Today’s gospel gives us a glimpse into it while Jesus, passing by, speaks just a couple of words to some people and they followed him

The Epiphany of the Lord

Over the years we reminisce about our childhood and the “magical” season of Christmas. We pestered our parents to tell us one-more-time the story of the Wise Men (Magi) coming from far distant lands in search of a king foretold by the stars. Many could not wait until their parents set-up the family crèche. Each day throughout Advent we would move the Wise Men a little closer to the cave where the baby Jesus would appear on Christmas day.

Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God

One of my fondest childhood memories is of my Dad teaching me how to ride a bike on the church parking lot. In retrospect, a paved venue was probably a poor choice, considering the number of times I came in sudden contact with the ground, and also given that this was well before the days of protective headwear. Still, it was a wonderful experience...

The Nativity of the Lord

Among my favorite Christmas stories is one that has little direct connection to Bethlehem or angels and shepherds, or carols or even Hallmark movies. Rather, it’s an episode from the television series “Everybody Loves Raymond.” Raymond, the favored son of the family, decides to give his parents the gift of a toaster for Christmas, inscribed with a message of love from his wife, his children and himself.

Fourth Sunday of Advent - Year A

We have heard these words so many times we may overlook the significance of what they mean. The birth of Jesus came about because of the cooperation of ordinary human beings. We know that Mary was an ordinary young girl - chosen to do extraordinary things - but she was still ordinary in the sense that she was of the usual stock and family and characteristics of her time. Joseph, too, was an ordinary, hard-working laborer, a well-respected member of the community but definitely an “ordinary Joe” of his day. Both were rather remarkable for their “unremarkableness.” 

Third Sunday of Advent - Year A

At the end of our recent election I heard people of both sides saying T.G.I.O. – Thank God it’s over. They were expressing the weariness of a long and stressful election cycle. At this time of the year when advertisements barrage us from every direction about buying for Christmas and the countdown of shopping days to Christmas, I am sure that the annual question of “When will it be over?” is occurring in the wearied minds of many.

Solemnity of Christ the King - Year C

How is your prayer life at this time? When you go into the silence of your room or when you come earlier into this Church and place yourself, once again in all humility before God, what do you pray for? Very often we pray for our families and our relatives; we pray for people who are sick and for those who suffer, especially those we know. We come in humility before a God who listens to us...